Toward effective and equitable environmental governance

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The impact of human activities on the environment results in increasing competition for access to natural resources, and in major environmental and social changes. Addressing the consequences of such effects require changes in the way societies interact. How can we deal with such impacts without supranational institutions, or when the power of such institutions is limited? Is it then possible to promote appropriate coordination between agents in order to manage environmental issues? How do individual preferences induce pro-environmental behaviors? Is the effect of inequalities on cooperation positive or negative? What is the role of equity in the way environmental policies are designed?

This research group tackles these challenges by relying on political economics, social choice theory and environmental economics. More specifically, we rely mainly on game theory, contract theory, axiomatic approaches and applied econometrics.

Research works are focused on two main priorities. The first one is related to the specifics of governance systems: we analyze the interplay between interacting agents’ behaviors and  governance systems, accounting for different scales (local, national, international). The second priority focuses on individuals’ preferences and the effect of inequalities, in particular inequalities in the access to natural resources and in the vulnerability to climate changes.

Faculty members

BAZART Cécile

Assistant Professor

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BRAID Robert

Assistant professor

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CHEIKBOSSIAN Guillaume

Professor

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COURTOIS Pierre

Research Professor

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GROLLEAU Gilles

Professor

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IBANEZ Lisette

Research Professor

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MAGDALOU Brice

Professor

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PIETRI Antoine

Assistant professor

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PRIEUR Fabien

Professor

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QUEROU Nicolas

Tenured Researcher

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SAUQUET Alexandre

Tenured Researcher

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SERRA Daniel

Professor Emeritus

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SOUBEYRAN Raphaël

Research Professor

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TIDBALL Mabel

Research Professor

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WILLINGER Marc

Professor

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Ph.D Students & Post-docs

ADJEROUD Feriel

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AYMERIC Gaëlle

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EL RAFHI Bilal

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GILLET Charles

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LATOURTE Jean-Charles

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TATARNIKOVA Olga

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Staff

DUBOIS Dimitri

Research Engineer

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Scandals : a ‘reset button’ to drive change?

Grolleau Gilles, Marciano Alain, Mzoughi Naoufel
à paraître
Organizational Dynamics
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Are individuals more generous in loss contexts?

Cochard Francois, Flage Alexandre, Grolleau Gilles, Sutan Angela
à paraître
Social Choice and Welfare
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Can common ownership prevent the tragedy of the commons? An experimental investigation

Puzon Karizze, Willinger Marc
à paraître
Review of Behavioral Economics
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Quels déterminants aux préférences pour la redistribution ?

Magdalou Brice
à paraître
Revue Française d'Economie
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Is a 'bad individual' more condemnable than several 'bad individuals'? Examining the scope-severity paradox

Grolleau GillesIbanez Lisette, Mzoughi Naoufel
à paraître
Review of Law & Economics
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Ranking distributions of an ordinal variable

Gravel Nicolas, Magdalou Brice, Moyes Patrick
à paraître
Economic Theory
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Fertile ground for conflict

Berman Nicolas, Couttenier Mathieu, Soubeyran Raphaël
à paraître
Journal of the European Economic Association
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Improving relocation acceptability by improving information and governance quality/results from a survey conducted in France

Bazart Cécile, Trouillet Raphaël, Rey-Valette HélèneLautredou-Audouy Nicole
2020
Climatic Change
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On signaling disability in anonymous economic games

Max Sylvain, Grolleau Gilles, Perchot Rodolphe, Sutan Angela
2020
Journal of Economic Psychology
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Social preferences and coordination: An experiment

Gueye Mamadou, Querou NicolasSoubeyran Raphael
2020
Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization
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Can shorter transfer chains and transparency reduce embezzlement?

Di Falco Salvatore, Magdalou Brice, Masclet David, Villeval Marie Claire, Willinger Marc
2020
Review of Behavioral Economics
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Moral judgment of environmental harm caused by a single versus multiple wrongdoers: a survey experiment

Grolleau GillesIbanez Lisette, Mzoughi Naoufel
2020
Ecological Economics
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Whistleblowing vs random audit : An experimental test of relative efficiency

Bazart CécileBeaud MickaëlDubois Dimitri
2020
Kyklos
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The perils of democracy

DeAngelo Gregory J., Dubois Dimitri, Romaniuc Rustam
2020
Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization
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State predation in historical perspective: the case of Ottoman müsadere practice during 1695–1839

Arslantaş Yasin, Pietri Antoine, Vahabi Mehrdad
2019
Public Choice
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How to turn crowding-out into crowding-in? An innovative instrument and some law-related examples

Beretti Antoine, Figuières Charles, Grolleau Gilles
2019
European Journal of Law and Economics
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Building new kinds of meta-models to analyse experimentally (companion) modelling processes in the field of natural resource management

Bonté Bruno, Farolfi Stefano, Ferrand Nils, Abrami Géraldine, Diallo Mamadou Ciss, Dubois Dimitri, Johannet Anne, Gaudi Wanda Aquae
2019
Environmental Modelling & Software
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Comportements pro-environnementaux et exposition à la nature : une étude expérimentale

Ibanez LisetteLatourte Jean-CharlesRoussel Sébastien
2019
Revue Economique
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Do positional preferences cause welfare gains?

Bougherara Douadia, Costa Sandrine, Grolleau GillesIbanez Lisette
2019
Economics Bulletin
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Do people trust more when they are happy or when they are sad? Evidence from an experiment

Saadaoui Hayet, El Harbi Sana, Ibanez Lisette
2019
Managerial and Decision Economics
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Spatial data infrastructure management: a two-sided market approach for strategic reflections

Jabbour Chady, Rey-valette Hélène, Maurel Pierre, Salles Jean-Michel
2019
International Journal of Information Management
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Inequality measurement with an ordinal and continuous variable

Gravel Nicolas, Moyes Patrick, Magdalou Brice
2019
Social Choice and Welfare
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"Facta Non Verba": an experiment on pledging and giving

Sutan Angela, Grolleau Gilles, Mateu Guillermo, Vranceanu Radu
2018
Journal of Economic Psychology
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Environmental investments: too much of a good thing?

Petkovic Sanja, Grolleau Gilles, Mzoughi Naofel
2018
International Journal of Production Economics
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How crucial are preferences for non-tradable goods and cross-country sectoral TFP gap for integration?

Davin Marion, Gente Karine, Nourry Carine
2018
Journal of Macroeconomics
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Confinobs project – Barrier and containment compliance and observation: a behavioural economics approach

The CONFINOBS project seeks at identifying the determinants of the propensity to adopt and follow the recommendations of prevention and containment with respect to the spread of Covid-19 virus. The basic premise is that this propensity is determined by individuals’ personal characteristics of the individual: their risk-preferences, impatience, self-control and social preferences (e.g., altruism, generosity, trust and cooperativeness). The main objective is to identify the effect of these behavioral dimensions on compliance with containment measures and adoption of barrier gestures. Their knowledge is an essential prerequisite for designing more effective non-coercive instruments, such as monetary and non-monetary incentives (nudges), to better target communication during and after the crisis, and to increase its impact on behavior.

The project combines several experimental tools which allow to precisely measure the different behavioral dimensions (e.g., risk aversion, impatience, altruism or trust) based on incentivized tasks. Some measures, including risk preferences, will be doubled by declarative measures and genotyping, in order to provide converging evidence of the robustness of the main determinants. We further implement a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to document individuals’ willingness to comply with the binding measures. We also test the effectiveness of a “nudge” that was designed to encourage individuals to comply. Our results will be used to determine the right levers of actions for effective communication towards target audiences, with a view to, for example, adopt the observance of barrier gestures.

GREENGO – New Tools for the Governance of the Energy Transition : the role of NGOs

Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are now central actors of policy-making processes as well as initiators of public debates about the needs of environmental policies.
They play a critical role in public politics by providing people with information about the environmental state of the world, bringing social and environmental issues to public awareness, and mobilizing support for political action on these issues.

The aim of the project is to provide analysis and new insight into the economic behavior and strategies of NGOs with respect to the environment.

Guet Ndar – Local adaptation at risk on the Barbary Tongue (Senegal)
  • Funding : Key-Initiative MUSE Sea & Coast
  • Duration : 2018 –
  • Contact : WILLINGER Marc

AAP Kim Waters, “Sea & Coast”Local adaptation at risk on the Barbary Tongue (Senegal)

For centuries, the habitat of the villagers of Guet Ndar (Senegal) is exposed to floods of the Senegal River and marine submersions. The high exposure to natural hazards (submersion, flooding) of the population suggests that its inhabitants have adapted to this unique environment, through the selection of the most suitable gene varieties. The project aims at investigating the hypothesis of local adaptation to risk for the inhabitants of Guet Ndar. Local adaptation is possible when three conditions are met: (1) the average migration distance is smaller than the size of the risky area, (2) the behavioral trait adapted to the risky environment (risk tolerance) is transmissible, and (3) living in the risky area provides material benefits that compensate for the exposure to risk. It is highly probable that these conditions are met in the village of Guet Ndar: (1) the migration rate is low, especially among the population of fishermen who pass on their inheritance (canoes, houses, …) to their descendants, (2) the targeted gene, DRD4, is endowed with exceptional variability and is transmissible and (3) the risky area gives access to fisheries resources that have historically been abundant. The risky area (Barbary tongue) is a narrow strip of land of 250 meters in its widest width that extends for about 900 meters in the populated area. Almost all the inhabitants are born there, just like their ancestors. The fishermen of Guet Ndar are renowned for their know-how, not only in Senegal but in several neighboring coastal countries, where they are often recruited to transmit their fishing techniques developed over generations. Fishermen represent the target population of our study because they are most likely to have adapted to local conditions, an adaptation that is expressed by their greater propensity to take risks compared to non-fishermen.

Coordination: Omar Sene & Marc Willinger

Research team: Gwen-Jiro Clochard (CREST, Ecole Polytechnique), Charlotte Faurie (ISEM, CNRS), Guillaume Hollard (CREST, CNRS), Clément Mettling (ISEM, CNRS), Michel Raymond (ISEM, CNRS), Omar Sene (Université Alioune Diop, Bambey , Sénégal), Marc Willinger (CEE-M, UM).

ORDINEQ – The Measurement of Ordinal and Multidimensional Inequalities

Building on the fiction of the paternalistic ethical observer, we propose to construct measures of socio-economic performance and well-being that (i) acknowledge the multidimensional nature of well-being, (ii) pay due attention to the distribution and interaction between the attributes, and (iii) take full account of the measurability nature of the attributes.
These measures will make one able to provide answers to questions of interest for the policy-maker and the general public like the following:

  • Q1. Can we correctly claim that our health system guarantees equal access to medical care whatever the circumstances of the individuals? Is a move in direction to the British health care system likely to reduce the inequalities of health statuses among the population?
  • Q2. Does the poor performance on average of French students at the PISA tests go along with high inequalities in the distributions of the scores suggesting that the French educational system might be doubly inefficient?
    To which extent inequalities – provided that there is evidence of such inequalities – in reading, mathematics and problem solving are related to the socio-economic characteristics of the parents and more generally to their origins?
  • Q3. Is ex-post redistribution by means of progressive tax-benefit systems more effective in reducing the long run income inequalities than an ex-ante redistributive policy that would tax more heavily the intergenerational transmission of wealth?
RediPref – The Preferences for Redistribution: Foundations, Representation and Implications for Social Decisions

How do individuals perceive inequalities? Do we have to consider all inequalities as unfair?

In parallel to the worsening of the income and wealth inequalities, the last decades have also been characterised by increased social risks. These essentially originate in the profound changes in the labour market structure that go along with a deterioration of the unemployment rates. Hence, even if individuals are concerned with fairness considerations, it is not clear to what extent preferences for redistribution can be associated with such motives. Redistribution can be perceived as social insurance, and thus risk aversion of the individuals may came into play.

The project aims at shedding new light on the preferences for redistribution, by providing a better description of people’s perceptions of inequality and social risks.

The benefits for society of the project would be to provide the social planner with implementable social decision rules which reflect the individual preferences for redistribution, that can be used in public policy making.

 

Group Leader

IBANEZ Lisette

Faculty

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