Towards effective and equitable environmental governance

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The impact of human activities on the environment results in increasing competition for access to natural resources, and in major environmental and social changes. Addressing the consequences of such effects require changes in the way societies interact. How can we deal with such impacts without supranational institutions, or when the power of such institutions is limited? Is it then possible to promote appropriate coordination between agents in order to manage environmental issues? How do individual preferences induce pro-environmental behaviors? Is the effect of inequalities on cooperation positive or negative? What is the role of equity in the way environmental policies are designed?

This research group tackles these challenges by relying on political economics, social choice theory and environmental economics. More specifically, we rely mainly on game theory, contract theory, axiomatic approaches and applied econometrics.

Research works are focused on two main priorities. The first one is related to the specifics of governance systems: we analyze the interplay between interacting agents’ behaviors and  governance systems, accounting for different scales (local, national, international). The second priority focuses on individuals’ preferences and the effect of inequalities, in particular inequalities in the access to natural resources and in the vulnerability to climate changes.

Faculty members

BAZART Cécile

Assistant Professor

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BRAID Robert

Assistant professor

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BRIOLE Simon

Tenured Researcher

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CHEIKBOSSIAN Guillaume

Professor

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COURTOIS Pierre

Research Professor

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DESBUREAUX Sébastien

Tenured Researcher

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IBANEZ Lisette

Research Professor

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MAGDALOU Brice

Professor

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PIETRI Antoine

Assistant professor

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PRIEUR Fabien

Professor

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QUEROU Nicolas

Research Professor

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SAUQUET Alexandre

Tenured Researcher

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SERRA Daniel

Professor Emeritus

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SOUBEYRAN Raphaël

Research Professor

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TIDBALL Mabel

Research Professor

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WILLINGER Marc

Professor

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Ph.D Students & Post-docs

ADJEROUD Feriel

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AYMERIC Gaëlle

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BAYLE Gabriel

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BOBIN Noémie

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DAI Miao

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GIRARD Julia

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LAFROGNE Aurélien

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MATHEX Simon

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MONTOYA HERRERA Daniel

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NIKIEMA Richard Gilbert

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PINÇON Violette

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SALESSE Camille

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Staff

BARREAU Vincent

Administrative & Scientific Assistant

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DUBOIS Dimitri

Research Engineer

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ZEDDOUR MOHAMED BRAHIM Hafida

Research Engineer

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Contrasting risk preferences in the shadow of volcanic background risk: a field experiment in Arequipa, Perú

Bchir Mohamed Ali, Cohen Caroline, Sene Omar, Willinger Marc
à paraître
Applied Economics
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Olfactory Cues of Naturally Occurring Systemic Inflammation: A Pilot Study of Seasonal Allergy

Tognetti Arnaud,  Saluja Supreet,  Lybert Nathalie,  Lasselin Julie,  Tamm Sandra,  Lensmar Catarina,  Karshikoff Bianka,  Cervenka Simon,  Lekander Mats,  Olsson Mats J
à paraître
Neuroimmunomodulation
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Valuation of ecosystem services and social choice: the impact of deliberation in the context of two different aggregation rules

Sy Mariam Maki, Figuières Charles, Rey-Valette Hélène, Howarth Richard, de Wit Rutger
à paraître
Social Choice and Welfare
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Tous les chemins menaient au Vietnam : La tragédie de Johnson revisitée

Baranets Elie, Pietri Antoine
à paraître
Études internationales
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L'effet de licence comme ressort de l'effet rebond : revue de littérature et pistes de réflexion

Mathex Simon
2024
Revue d'économie industrielle
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Retour sur la co-construction de stratégies de recomposition spatiale. Le cas de l’Occitanie (France)

Rey-Valette Hélène, Richard Alexandre, Michel Laura, Richard-Ferroudji Audrey, Heurtefeux Hugues, Lecha Victor, Barral Marc, Cabrit Amandine, Netter Sarah, Lanzellotti Provence
2024
VertigO : La Revue Électronique en Sciences de l'Environnement
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Revolutions and rational choice: A critical discussion

Courtois Pierre, Nessah Rabia, Tazdaït Tarik
2024
Public Choice
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Optimal lockdown and vaccination policies to contain the spread of a mutating infectious disease

Prieur Fabien, Ruan Weihua, Zou Benteng
2024
Economic Theory
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Effectiveness of the approval mechanism in a three-player common pool resource dilemma

Yao Koffi Serge William, Lavaine EmmanuelleWillinger Marc
2024
Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics
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Consumer impatience: A key motive for Covid-19 vaccination

Guillon Marlène, Nguyen-Van Phu, Ventelou Bruno, Willinger Marc
2024
Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics
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Beliefs and preferences as predictors of prophylactic adherence and lockdown compliance in South Africa

Farolfi Stefano, Jourdain Damien,  Mungatana Eric, Nicholls Nicky, Willinger Marc, Yitbarek Eleni
2024
Development Southern Africa
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Appréhender les trajectoires d’engagement dans la gouvernance d’une politique environnementale : l’exemple de Natura 2000 en mer

Beuret Jean-Eudes,  Rey-Valette Hélène,  Clennell Mathilda
2023
Géographie, Économie, Société
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Interdire les voitures pour promouvoir les vélos ? Une étude sur la ville de Tours

Pietri Antoine
2023
Revue d'économie régionale et urbaine
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Assessing sickness behavior in the French: Validation of the French translation of the sickness questionnaire (SicknessQ) in a non-clinical French population

Andreasson Anna,  Tognetti Arnaud,  Jones Mike,  Lekander Mats,  Lasselin Julie
2023
Brain, Behavior & Immunity - Health
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Discriminating between sick and healthy faces based on early sickness cues: an exploratory analysis of sex differences

Tognetti Arnaud,  Thunell Evelina,  Zakrzewska Marta,  Olofsson Jonas,  Lekander Mats,  Axelsson John,  Olsson Mats J
2023
Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health
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Stated preferences outperform elicited preferences for predicting reported compliance with Covid-19 prophylactic measures

Rafaï Ismaël, Blayac ThierryDubois DimitriDuchêne Sébastien, Nguyen-Van Phu, Ventelou Bruno, Willinger Marc
2023
Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics
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The birthplace bias of teleworking: Consequences for working conditions

Moreno Galbis Eva,  Trillos Felipe
2023
Labour
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Portfolio instability and socially responsible investment: Experiments with financial professionals and students

Tatarnikova Olga,  Duchêne Sébastien,  Sentis Patrick,  Willinger Marc
2023
Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control
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Valuing ecosystem services within the territorial development approach: the ecosystem services basket in the Karaburun Peninsula, Turkey

Yildirim Heval, Requier-Desjardins Mélanie M., Rey-Valette Helene, Pecqueur Bernard
2023
International Journal of Sustainable Development
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What can be expected from mergers after deregulation? The case of the long-distance bus industry in France

Blayac Thierry, Bougette Patrice
2023
Review of Industrial Organization
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Does a company’s origin matter in moral judgment?

Dib-Slamani Hind, Grolleau Gilles, Mzoughi Naoufel
2023
BRQ Business Research Quarterly
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What drives the acceptability of restrictive health policies: An experimental assessment of individual preferences for anti-COVID 19 strategies

Blayac ThierryDubois DimitriDuchêne Sébastien, Nguyen-Van Phu, Ventelou Bruno, Willinger Marc
2022
Economic Modelling
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Lobbying, Public Persuasion, and Environmental Policy under Imperfect Competition

Cheikbossian Guillaume, Hafidi Houda
2022
Annals of Economics and Statistics
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The impact of nature video exposure on pro-environmental behavior: An experimental investigation

Ibanez LisetteRoussel Sébastien
2022
PLoS ONE
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God did not save the kings: Environmental consequences of the 1982 Falklands War

Panel Sophie, Pietri Antoine
2022
Ecological Economics
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ECODECEAU – Behavioral Economics for Waste and Water

The aim of this project is to implement and evaluate incentive mechanims to reduce domestic water consumption and improve waste sorting. We will design incentives based on social norms (belonging to a group and comparison with peers) via different media (digital, physical…) and test them at the household level. The methodological approach will combine behavioral economics and sociology through a collaborative research project between CEE-M and LyRE / SUEZ. We will rely on experimental (lab) and empirical approaches through Randomized Control Trials (RCTs).

GREENGO – New Tools for the Governance of the Energy Transition : the role of NGOs

Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are now central actors of policy-making processes as well as initiators of public debates about the needs of environmental policies.
They play a critical role in public politics by providing people with information about the environmental state of the world, bringing social and environmental issues to public awareness, and mobilizing support for political action on these issues.

The aim of the project is to provide analysis and new insight into the economic behavior and strategies of NGOs with respect to the environment.

Guet Ndar – Local adaptation at risk on the Barbary Tongue (Senegal)
  • Funding : Key-Initiative MUSE Sea & Coast
  • Duration : 2018 –
  • Contact : WILLINGER Marc

AAP Kim Waters, “Sea & Coast”Local adaptation at risk on the Barbary Tongue (Senegal)

For centuries, the habitat of the villagers of Guet Ndar (Senegal) is exposed to floods of the Senegal River and marine submersions. The high exposure to natural hazards (submersion, flooding) of the population suggests that its inhabitants have adapted to this unique environment, through the selection of the most suitable gene varieties. The project aims at investigating the hypothesis of local adaptation to risk for the inhabitants of Guet Ndar. Local adaptation is possible when three conditions are met: (1) the average migration distance is smaller than the size of the risky area, (2) the behavioral trait adapted to the risky environment (risk tolerance) is transmissible, and (3) living in the risky area provides material benefits that compensate for the exposure to risk. It is highly probable that these conditions are met in the village of Guet Ndar: (1) the migration rate is low, especially among the population of fishermen who pass on their inheritance (canoes, houses, …) to their descendants, (2) the targeted gene, DRD4, is endowed with exceptional variability and is transmissible and (3) the risky area gives access to fisheries resources that have historically been abundant. The risky area (Barbary tongue) is a narrow strip of land of 250 meters in its widest width that extends for about 900 meters in the populated area. Almost all the inhabitants are born there, just like their ancestors. The fishermen of Guet Ndar are renowned for their know-how, not only in Senegal but in several neighboring coastal countries, where they are often recruited to transmit their fishing techniques developed over generations. Fishermen represent the target population of our study because they are most likely to have adapted to local conditions, an adaptation that is expressed by their greater propensity to take risks compared to non-fishermen.

Coordination: Omar Sene & Marc Willinger

Research team: Gwen-Jiro Clochard (CREST, Ecole Polytechnique), Charlotte Faurie (ISEM, CNRS), Guillaume Hollard (CREST, CNRS), Clément Mettling (ISEM, CNRS), Michel Raymond (ISEM, CNRS), Omar Sene (Université Alioune Diop, Bambey , Sénégal), Marc Willinger (CEE-M, UM).

ORDINEQ – The Measurement of Ordinal and Multidimensional Inequalities

Building on the fiction of the paternalistic ethical observer, we propose to construct measures of socio-economic performance and well-being that (i) acknowledge the multidimensional nature of well-being, (ii) pay due attention to the distribution and interaction between the attributes, and (iii) take full account of the measurability nature of the attributes.
These measures will make one able to provide answers to questions of interest for the policy-maker and the general public like the following:

  • Q1. Can we correctly claim that our health system guarantees equal access to medical care whatever the circumstances of the individuals? Is a move in direction to the British health care system likely to reduce the inequalities of health statuses among the population?
  • Q2. Does the poor performance on average of French students at the PISA tests go along with high inequalities in the distributions of the scores suggesting that the French educational system might be doubly inefficient?
    To which extent inequalities – provided that there is evidence of such inequalities – in reading, mathematics and problem solving are related to the socio-economic characteristics of the parents and more generally to their origins?
  • Q3. Is ex-post redistribution by means of progressive tax-benefit systems more effective in reducing the long run income inequalities than an ex-ante redistributive policy that would tax more heavily the intergenerational transmission of wealth?
RediPref – The Preferences for Redistribution: Foundations, Representation and Implications for Social Decisions

How do individuals perceive inequalities? Do we have to consider all inequalities as unfair?

In parallel to the worsening of the income and wealth inequalities, the last decades have also been characterised by increased social risks. These essentially originate in the profound changes in the labour market structure that go along with a deterioration of the unemployment rates. Hence, even if individuals are concerned with fairness considerations, it is not clear to what extent preferences for redistribution can be associated with such motives. Redistribution can be perceived as social insurance, and thus risk aversion of the individuals may came into play.

The project aims at shedding new light on the preferences for redistribution, by providing a better description of people’s perceptions of inequality and social risks.

The benefits for society of the project would be to provide the social planner with implementable social decision rules which reflect the individual preferences for redistribution, that can be used in public policy making.

 

Group Leader

ROUSSEL Sébastien

Faculty

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